Winter 2019

Published on Nov 16, 2020

Description:

The discovery of cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) in cucurbit crops in northern Australia in September 2014 resulted in affected properties being quarantined in order to prevent the spread of the highly transmissible virus. Recognising the impact of the incursion on cucurbit growers, researchers in Project VG15013 investigated ways to manage the virus through on-farm biosecurity practices as well as improving the speed and accuracy of CGMMV diagnostics.

Cover:

Winter 2019
5 articles from this collection:
Improved management options for cucumber green mottle mosaic virus
Improved management options for cucumber green mottle mosaic virus
The discovery of cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) in cucurbit crops in northern Australia in September 2014 resulted in affected properties being quarantined in order to prevent the spread of the highly transmissible virus. Recognising the impact of the incursion on cucurbit growers, researchers in Project VG15013 investigated ways to manage the virus through on-farm biosecurity practices as well as improving the speed and accuracy of CGMMV diagnostics.
Extending the message on virus and bacterial diseases in vegetables
Extending the message on virus and bacterial diseases in vegetables
Key to implementing useful and strategic management strategies to control diseases in vegetable crops is the correct identification of the problem and also avoiding new problems entering crops.
Soil wealth and ICP
Soil wealth and ICP
The Soil Wealth and Integrated Crop Protection (ICP) projects work with growers nationally to put soil management and plant health research into practice.
VegNET IEO
VegNET IEO
Winter is coming! No, that is not a reference to a popular, medieval, fantasy drama series. However, as the temperature drops, like the Lords of the North we enter a new season of caution and surveillance.
Grower tour
Grower tour
Australian potato industry members embarked on an overseas adventure to New Zealand’s Canterbury region from 12-15 February, where 19 representatives from Victoria, Tasmania and Western Australia gained an insight into Tomato potato psyllid (TPP) and how the New Zealand potato industry has managed this pest.